The Untouchables – Culture Clash

Codin Oraseanu
Dec 06, 2020
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Launched at the beginning of 2020, DNO Records announces its 4th vinyl release, signing five tracks from the Belgian duo, The Untouchables. Kate and Ajit don’t need much of an introduction as they are producers with strong releases to show their versatility. Part of the Samurai Music family, The Untouchables constructed their unique sound where elements of jungle and dub are forming a bridge under 170 BPM productions. 

'Culture Clash', the forthcoming release at DNO Records, 29th of January 2021, is one of their best so far. In the five tracks, four on the vinyl and a bonus digital one, they construct a thirty minutes moment of imponderability. In this one, Kate and Ajit moved freely in the tempo range allowing the listener to move from one state of mind to the other. The opening track, Audacity, is there to mark the sound of the Untouchables. Distorted kick, a half-step rhythm, a tempo that touches the jungle feeling, and the syncopated percussions to pinpoint the listener to the duos sound. Galactic Noise continues with the uptempo but stripes down some elements, giving the listener the space to concentrate on the synth; all the other layers are there only to support the harsh synth. Even after the second drop where is not so present anymore, you still think of it. 

 

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On the third track, Culture Clash, the tempo drops to 140, but you hardly feel this due to carefully arranged percussions that keep the half-step feel and the continuous movement. It is as if you are driving in the fast lane but still have the time to enjoy the side view. On the fourth and last track of the vinyl, Time Travelers, The Untouchables constructs a symphony of delays. Your first drive will be to catch all the elements that move from your left to right year, but you will fail. They keep on coming. The secret is not to think of them and let your mind flow as far as it can. The music is there not to be deconstructed, but to offer you the meanings to escape the ordinary. 

On the dancefloor, among the DJs and producers, there is a saying when a track is heavy. They say that it is a weapon, in the sense that when you drop it in, you have a wild card that assures the audience's response. It is used more often in drum and bass, and you will probably see that a lot of producers dive into this kind of tracks and sound. What impressed me on The Untouchables release is that they focused on the sound and the atmosphere, creating not weapons, but an Ep that can be both played in a club and also listened to on repeat back home. 

You can preorder the release on the label's Bandcamp, or you can follow the usual records shop. Either way, be sure to grab this one. 

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